Directory of Diseases

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z #
MCL Sprain

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) sprain refers to an injury from extreme stretching of the ligament on the inner border of the knee. The MCL helps stabilize the knee. Once this ligament becomes injured one experiences pain on the inside of the knee that worsens by pulling the lower leg outwards or turning the foot outwards. People often experience pain with palpation of the medial (inner) aspect of the knee. Often people feel better keeping their leg straight. People with this injury prefer to walk with the leg straight and the knee locked in extension. This type of injury does not cause swelling of the knee and usually heals well after resting the knee for a few weeks.

Major Depressive Disorder (Severe Depression)

A disorder causing severe sadness and other physical complaints. The diagnosis is made when five or more symptoms of depression are present for at least 2 weeks. Please see the symptom section for a list of these symptoms. Major depression carries a risk of suicide if not appropriately treated. The cause of major depression is not known but the following conditions increase the risk of the disorder: parents with depression, a difficult childhood, stressful events, poor social supports, serious illnesses, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and poverty. This disorder can occur at any age and is more common in women.

Major Depressive Disorder with Suicidal Ideation

A disorder causing severe sadness and other physical complaints. The diagnosis is made when five or more symptoms of depression are present for at least 2 weeks. Please see the symptom section for a list of these symptoms. Major depression carries a risk of suicide if not appropriately treated. The cause of major depression is not known but the following conditions increase the risk of the disorder: parents with depression, a difficult childhood, stressful events, poor social supports, serious illnesses, alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and poverty. This disorder can occur at any age and is more common in women.

Male Pattern Baldness (Androgenic Alopecia)

The most common cause of hair loss is called androgenic alopecia. This is also called "male pattern baldness". This is caused when hormones related to testosterone (called "androgens") cause hair follicles to have shorter-than-normal growth phase resulting is hair follicles that are abnormally short and thin. It is unclear why some men develop male pattern baldness but it is thought to be related to family history.

Mandibular Fracture (Broken Jaw)

Mandible fracture refers to a broken or fractured jaw bone. The jaw bone makes up the lower part of the face and is necessary for chewing and talking. The jaw bone can break if it is struck with enough force. A strong punch or an impact with a fast moving object can be sufficient force to break this bone. When one has a broken jaw the bite feels out of alignment, is difficult to bite down, hard to chew or talk. Most of these fractures require surgery to be properly treated. Only x-rays or a CT can confirm this diagnosis.