Directory of Diseases

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z #
Ulnar collateral ligament injury

An ulnar collateral ligament injury is caused by straining one of the stabilizing ligaments in the elbow during repetitive sports-related activities such as throwing a ball over your head. This injury can lead to chronic pain in the inner elbow. If untreated and progressive, the patient may have significant decline in sports performance. This condition should be evaluated by an orthopedic specialist.

Upper Respiratory Tract Infection (URI)

An upper respiratory infection (URI) is the medical name for the 'common cold'. This is a viral infection of the upper airway and usually lasts 2-7 days. People who have URI's may experience low grade fevers, body aches, sneezing, scratchy or sore throat, runny nose and a dry cough. There are over 100 viruses that can cause a 'cold' and they are contagious. URIs generally resolve on their own with sleep and drinking plenty of fluids.

Upper extremity arthritis

This is an inflammatory condition that is typically brought on by age and chronic use or overuse of a joint. While not usually dangerous or serious, this can be very uncomfortable and should be evaluated by a physician.

Ureterolithiasis with Colic (Kidney Stone)

When a kidney stone starts to travel down the ureter, it can cause severe flank or back pain. Kidney stones are small, hard, solid particles that are slightly larger than a grain of sand. Once they leave the kidney and start to travel down the tube that connects the kidney with the urinary bladder (ureter), they can cause symptoms. Patients usually experience flank pain, nausea, vomiting, and have blood in the urine. Often, the patient will be described as moving around or "writhing" in pain due to its severity. The pain arises from contractions of the ureter as it tries to push out the stone. The most severe pain is usually experienced right before the stone enters the urinary bladder. The pain usually feels like a severe pressure or cramp on one's side and occasionally it radiates to the groin. Relief comes once the kidney stone enters the bladder. The more one urinates, the more quickly the stone moves down the ureter.

Urethritis, men (Infection Of Urethra)

Urethritis is inflammation of the urethra. The urethra is the tube that carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body. The infection is classified as either gonococcal urethritis or non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU). NGU can be due to infection but not always. In men, a cloudy discharge usually indicates a gonoccocal urethritis; while clear discharge indicates NGU. In women, the disorder is difficult to diagnose because discharge may not be present. Both sexes may experience burning during urination. Urethritis is not the same as a urinary tract infection (UTI); the two diseases may have similar symptoms, but the treatment is different. Bacteria associated

Urinary Tract infection (UTI) in a Female

Urinary tract infections ('UTIs',) are typically bacterial infections present in the bladder and urinary tract. UTIs in men can be caused by infections in the prostate, epididymis, or by the presence of a urinary catheter. UTIs can cause burning pain with urination, frequent urination, urgency when heading to the bathroom, cloudy or smelly urine, low back pain or lower abdominal discomfort. UTI's are rare in men under age 50. Women are more prone to UTIs because of a shorter urethra. If left untreated, simple UTI can spread to the the upper urinary tract (ureters and kidneys) causing a serious infection with fever, vomiting, and severe pain.

Urinary Tract infection (UTI) in a Male

Urinary tract infections ('UTIs',) are typically bacterial infections present in the bladder and urinary tract. UTIs in men can be caused by infections in the prostate, epididymis, or by the presence of a urinary catheter. UTIs can cause burning pain with urination, frequent urination, urgency when heading to the bathroom, cloudy or smelly urine, low back pain or lower abdominal discomfort. UTI's are rare in men under age 50. Women are more prone to UTIs because of a shorter urethra. If left untreated, simple UTI can spread to the the upper urinary tract (ureters and kidneys) causing a serious infection with fever, vomiting, and severe pain.

Urticaria (Hives)

Urticaria is an allergic type of rash that causes welts or raised bumps on the skin. This occurs from fluid accumulating under the skin causing swelling. This happens quickly over minutes from a reaction in the body that releases histamine. Usually this is the result of an allergic reaction. But for many people it can become a chronic and recurrent problem with no known or obvious cause. Usually urticaria is itchy. Because it is caused from the release of histamine it is treated with anti-histamine medications like bendryl, pepcid, zyrtec etc... Steroids are often used as well. Taking benadryl at the first sight of hives is a good idea.

Uterine Fibroids

Uterine fibroids are benign, non-cancerous muscle tumors of the uterus, also called leiomyomas. They can cause abnormal enlargement of the uterus leading to pain and pressure. Fibroids result from muscular and fibrous tissue overgrowth and can range in size from undetectable by human eye to large masses that can change the shape of the uterus. Patients with fibroids may experience vaginal bleeding (maybe heavy) with abdominal and pelvic cramping. However, many women have uterine fibroids without knowing because they do not experience symptoms. Fibroids generally begin to appear during the childbearing years and may affect female fertility.